Issue #128, 8th May 2015

This Week's Favorite


The Mother of All Management Anti-Patterns
3 minutes read.

"When managers refer to human beings as “resources,” they tend to treat people like “things.” It happens insidiously." -- wonderful, short and extremely important post. Before looking at things to get done, and how fast we can get there, lets start with understanding what's important and making sure expectations are set. Never be afraid to ask more from others, to challenge them, but never take them from granted or expect them to be a predictable machines neither.

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Culture


The Freemium vs Premium Model in One Photo
1 minutes read.

As always, something to start the weekend with a huge smile on your face.

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The 5 Stages of Developer Grief
37 minutes read.

Once again I think I found the perfect way for you to enjoy a great talk to listen to on your commute to work. This talk by Derick Bailey focuses on the human side of software and the problems that we face as developers -- "From open source work, to corporate life and client work, the emotions we deal with are an important part of our lives and something that must be discussion more openly and honestly if we are to move ourselves, our communities and our industry forward." -- download as audio and have fun.

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Building a Culture of Objection
4 minutes read.

Are we doing enough to allow people to offer better ways to achieve the same goal? Are we letting objection be part of a healthy discussion or do we immediately dismiss it? "We are trained to care for the members of our teams, to respect their opinions, but often accepting objections is not something we are taught."

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Reddit: We're Sharing Our Company's Core Values With the World
4 minutes read.

Reddit is celebrating 10 years, and as they're planning to grow further they did some nice writing on their core values. Reading it, I felt that it's really down to earth and honest. It's short, and feels like something someone can actually say without feeling like a fraud. What would you write if you had to share your core values with the world?

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Peopleware


The Founder’s Schedule
5 minutes read.

Sean Byrnes shares how you should manage your time as a startup founder in the very early days. While I'm not sure I think the exact suggestion is a good fit for all (and planning a 14 hours a day is far from being healthy), it's a good reminder to ask yourself whether or not your controlling your time wisely. We need to leave enough time to make sure we're working on the right things, rather than letting the daily pressure lead us.

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Tradeoffs
2 minutes read.

I just love the insight in this post: "Having an in-mind index of as many tools as possible and their strengths and weaknesses helps me pick the right tool for the current job." -- read it. Think about it. Are you building an list of tools to pick from, with the required depth to understand the pros&cons behind each tool and methodology? Are you cultivating it also on your organizational level?

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Coding Is Driving the Car (And More)
5 minutes read.

I've included this post as I believe it's a great brain teaser to think of how the future of programming will be like, and how it should (if at all) change the way we think about it. How deep do you go with figuring out how things work? What is your expectation from people within the team? Highly recommend reading the comments, as there is really good discussion there as well.

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Inspiring Tweets


@simonsinek: Leaders Own the Optimism.

@tferriss: Slow Down and Remember This: Most Things Make No Difference. Being Busy Is a Form of Laziness—lazy Thinking and Indiscriminate Action.

- Oren

P.S. Can you share this email? I'd love for more people to experiment and improve their company's culture.

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